Home

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention

Queens University of Charlotte is committed to providing a healthy, safe, and productive environment for our faculty, staff, and students. Part of the commitment entails establishing policy and providing information regarding a drug and alcohol abuse prevention. The effectiveness of the institution's drug and alcohol abuse prevention programs are reviewed biennially to determine if any changes are needed to improve the program and to ensure that any disciplinary sanctions are consistently enforced.

2015 Biennial Review
2013 Biennial Review

Health Risks

Abusing drugs and alcohol can have serious negative consequences on life beginning with various associated health risks.

Health Effects of Alcohol

Liver cancer, fatty liver, hepatitis, cirrhosis
Increased cancers of the mouth, tongue, pharynx, esophagus, rectum, breast and skin
Kidney disease
Ulcers
Increased acid in the stomach
Insomnia
Contributes to high blood pressure and strokes
Heart muscle disease or heart failure
Increased blood sugar levels which makes diabetes worse
Increased severity of mental health problems such as bipolar disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, and addiction

Health Effects of Marijuana 

Emphysema-like symptoms
Respiratory track and sinus infections
Lowered immune system response
Because users often inhale the unfiltered smoke deeply and then hold it in their lungs as long as possible, marijuana is damaging to the lungs and pulmonary system. Marijuana smoke contains more cancer-causing agents than tobacco smoke.

Health Effects of Hallucinogens

Persistent memory problems
Speech difficulties
Mood disorders, such as depression, anxiety and violent behavior
Paranoid and violent behavior
Hallucinations
Convulsions and coma
Heart and lung failure

Health Effects of Stimulants

Increased heart and respiratory rates
Elevated blood pressure
Sweating
Headaches
Blurred vision
Dizziness
Sleeplessness and anxiety
Rapid or irregular heartbeat
Tremors
Poor coordination
Physical collapse
Physical exertion while using stimulants can be dangerous because of the drugs' effects on the body's temperature-regulating and cardiovascular systems and can cause deaths in otherwise healthy young athletes.

North Carolina Law

Beyond the health risks, the illegal use of drugs and alcohol have serious punitive ramification under North Carolina State Law and Queens University of Charlotte policy.

The purchase or possession of beer, wine, liquor, or mixed beverages by a person less than 21 years old is illegal under North Carolina General Statute Section 18B - 101 et. Seq.. Similarly, it is illegal to sell beer, wine, liquor, or mixed beverages to those less than 21 years old or to aid and abet a person less than 21 years old in obtaining alcoholic beverages. It is illegal to use a fraudulent ID or to permit the use of one's ID by a person less than 21 years old to purchase alcoholic beverages. It is illegal to give alcoholic beverages to an intoxicated person. Unless a different punishment is otherwise expressly stated, any person who violates any provision of statute section 18B - 101 et. Seq. shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. Penalties range in seriousness from a fine to imprisonment or both. A conviction report is sent to the N.C. Division of Motor Vehicles and will result in the revocation of the offender's driver's license for a period of one year.

A criminal record (misdemeanor or felony) may preclude admission to graduate or professional schools, profession licensure and certification, or security clearance of certain professions and positions.

The following are relevant excerpts from North Carolina statutes regarding alcoholic beverages:

1. Possession of Beer, Liquor, or Unfortified Wine by Any Person Under the Age of 21:
Penalty- Offense will be considered a misdemeanor that will become a matter of public record as a criminal conviction and subject the person to court costs and fines. (General Statute 18B-302)

2.Purchase or Attempt to Purchase Beer or Unfortified Wine:
Penalty- Offense will be considered a misdemeanor that will become a matter of public record as a criminal conviction and subject the person to court costs and fines. If using false identification, the DMV will revoke the defendant's license for one year. (General Statute 18B-302)

3. Aid and Abet in the Sale, Purchase, and/or Possession of Alcohol by Anyone Less than 21 Years of Age (This includes giving alcohol to anyone less than 21 years of age):
Penalty- Any person who aids or abets an underage person in violating this law may be fined up to $1000, serve 150 hours of community service, and upon conviction the DMV will revoke the defendant's driver's license for one year. (General Statute 18B-302)

4. The Use or Attempt to use a Fraudulent or Altered Driver's License in order to obtain Alcoholic Beverages when not of Lawful Age; or a Fraudulent or Altered Identification Document other than a Driver's License; or a Driver's License Issued to Another Person; or an Identification Document other than a Driver's License Issued to Another Person:
Penalty-The offense will be a misdemeanor resulting in court costs and/or fine and the DMV will revoke the defendant's driver's license for one year. (General Statute 18B-302)

5. Permit the use of the One's Driver's License or any other Identification Document of any Kind by any Person under 21 to Purchase or Attempt to Purchase or Possess Alcohol:
Penalty-The offense will be a misdemeanor resulting in court costs and/or fine and the DMV will revoke the defendant's driver's license for one year. (General Statute 18B-302)

6. Impaired Driving. A person commits the offense of driving while impaired (DWI) if he/she drives a vehicle upon any highway, any street or any public vehicular area within this state; after having consumed sufficient alcohol that he/she has, at any relevant time after the driving, an alcohol concentration of 0.08 or more; or while under the influence of an impairing substance:
Penalty - If an intoxication test yields an alcohol concentration of 0.08 percent or greater, an individual's driving privileges will be revoked immediately for a minimum of 30 days. Any person convicted may be fined a maximum of $2000; serve 24 months in prison, and the DMV will revoke the defendant's driver's license for one year. (General Statute 18B-302)

Queens Policy

Queens students, faculty, and staff are responsible for being familiar and complying with institutional policy.

Standards of Conduct & Descriptions of Sanctions for Students
Student Handbook
(Page 60-61) - Drug enforcement policy
*Updated and shared with students online.

Honor Code
(Page 8-9) - Alcohol policy; (Page 11) - Drug policy; (Page 17) - Imminent Danger Policy (Includes removal for drugs); (Page 24-25) - All possible Sanctions

Description of Drug/Alcohol Counseling, Treatment or Rehabilitation
Student Handbook
(Page 42-43) - Mental Health services for alcohol/drug counseling

Students who are sanctioned or are in need of alcohol/drug assessments/rehabilitation are referred to Anuvia Prevention and Recovery Center or at Assessment Solutions. Queens has an ongoing relationship with these centers to provide counseling, treatment or rehabilitation services to students.

Standards of Conduct & Descriptions of Sanctions for Employees
Employee Handbook- Drug-Free Workplace Policy

Employee Assistance Program (EAP): Queens recognizes that from time to time everyone experiences stress, which may arise as a result of alcohol or drug problems, emotional problems, family problems, financial problems, or other problems. Queens provides regular employees and dependents who reside in the employee's household access to free, confidential counseling with professional counselors through the Employee Assistance program. Employees may contact the Employment Assistance Program directly at (704) 529-1428. Additional information can be found on the Human Resources page of MyQueens. Brochures are available in Human Resources.

Get To Know Us